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David Sanger

MANCHESTER >> David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, will look at the state of investigative reporting in a free public talk at Manchester's First Congregational Church on March 2 at 7 p.m. His talk,"The Future of Investigative Reporting," is part of the Vermont Humanities Council's First Wednesdays lecture series and is hosted in Manchester by the Manchester Community Library.

2016 is the centenary year of the Pulitzer Prize. In this talk, Sanger, a member of two Pulitzer-winning investigative teams, will look at what investigative reporting takes and what it will take in the future.

Sanger has reported on such issues as foreign policy, globalization, nuclear proliferation, and Asian affairs. While bureau chief of The New York Times in Tokyo, he developed a specialization in writing on the influence of economics and foreign policy, and the relationships between the United States and its major allies. He has received numerous journalistic awards, including being named twice among The New York Times reporting teams honored with the Pulitzer Prize. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Aspen Strategy Group. His latest book is "Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power."


The Vermont Humanities Council's First Wednesdays series is held on the first Wednesday of every month from October through May in nine communities statewide, featuring speakers of national and regional renown. All First Wednesdays talks are free and open to the public.

The National Life Group Foundation and the Vermont Department of Libraries are the statewide underwriters of First Wednesdays.

Manchester Community Library is sponsored by The Perfect Wife Restaurant and Tavern, The Spiral Press Café, and Vermont Renewable Fuels.

The Future of Investigative Reporting" is underwritten by Keelan Family Foundation.

"The Future of Investigative Reporting" is part of the Pulitzer Prizes Centennial Campfires Initiative, a joint venture of the Pulitzer Prizes Board and the Federation of State Humanities Councils in celebration of the 2016 centennial of the Prizes.

For more information, contact Manchester Community Library at 802.362.2607 or the Vermont Humanities Council at 802.262.2626 or, or visit