MANCHESTER - Russian author Anton Chekhov composed some three hundred short stories and about a dozen plays, which together established his worldwide fame before he died of tuberculosis at the age of forty-four. Green Mountain Academy for Lifelong Learning presents a lecture that explores Chekhov's enduring legacy as a fiction writer and dramatist by focusing on a single story, "The Lady with the Little Dog," and perhaps Chekhov's greatest play, "The Cherry Orchard." This lecture will consider not only the esthetic subtlety that made Chekhov, a practicing physician throughout his life, into the quintessential writer's writer, but also the ethical nuances that have kept his works at the heart of modern literature for more than a century.

The lecture entitled "Medicine is my lawful wife and literature is my mistress: The Legacy of Anton Chekhov" will be held on Tuesday, July 29, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the Hunter Seminar Room at Burr and Burton Academy in Manchester. The speaker is Professor Julie Cassiday of Williams College.

Professor Cassiday teaches Rus sian language, literature and culture in the Department of German and Russian, as well as world literature for the Program in Comparative Literature.

The registration fee is $15 if paid in advance or $20 at the door. For more information and to p re-register, visit greenmtnacademy.org or call Gloria Palmer at (802) 867-0111.

As an added bonus, the Park-McCullough House in North Bennington is hosting a production of The Cherry Orchard.


Advertisement

Dates for this event are Thursdays, July 31, and Aug. 7 at 7 p.m.; Fridays, Aug. 1 and 8 at 7 p.m.; and Saturdays, Aug. 2 and 9 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Reservations for the play may be made directly through the Park-McCullough House by calling (802) 442-5322.