Voters will be casting ballots for several other state races on Election Day. Below is a short list of endorsements this paper will offer for voter's consideration.

State Treasurer: This has been one race that has drawn a lot of attention and interest, as both Beth Pearce, the incumbent, and Wendy Wilton, a former state senator and Rutland's present city treasurer, have traded blows and undertaken vigorous campaigns for the office. Beth Pearce is without question a competent official who if she wins election (she was appointed to the post in 2011 to fill a vacancy), will no doubt serve Vermonters with skill and integrity. However, in this race, we're going to tilt towards Wilton, who brings a feisty passion that we find appealing. The post of state treasurer is not a policy making role, but rather an advisory, technocratic job that involves making possible the priorities of the governor. Should Mr. Shumlin prove successful in his bid for re-election, having an opinionated treasury secretary inside the councils of state government - particularly one with the proven track record of Wendy Wilton - would not be a bad thing.

State Auditor: Here, one of the state Senate's most senior members, Vincent Illuzzi of Essex County, is competing against Douglas Hoffer, who ran unsuccessfully two years ago against Thomas Salmon, who opted not to stand for re--election. Sen. Illuzzi has a made long career of independent viewpoints, bi-partisanship, and has a good understanding of the state budget and the process whereby things get done under the Golden Dome. We're supporting his bid for election to be the state's auditor.

Attorney General: After a hard-fought and narrowly won primary, William Sorrell, the incumbent attorney general, is hoping to serve an eighth term as the state's chief law enforcement officer. Mr. Sorrell does not have a bad record to run on, but there's something to the soft-spoken Jack McMullen we like. Maybe it's his strong business background, coupled with some sterling academic credentials. Whoever wins this post will have their hands full helping the state's police forces combat an upsurge in drug-related crime, without busting the budget. We think Mr. McMullen is more likely to square that circle.