Click photo to enlarge
Once the railroad was completed in 1853, Manchester Depot, the area around the train station, started to grow. One of the first businesses was W. H. FullertonĀ¹s Marble Works (1867) that made gravestones and monuments from Dorset marble. The building is now R K Miles kitchen and bath shop.

Friday, Aug. 8, 2008 

SEVENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO

Aug. 10, 1933

Fire destroyed Hurd's hall in Sandgate about four o'clock Saturday morning, as well as the adjoining home of Edwin J. Schneider, the owner and operator of the dance hall.

The Schneider family, including the two small children, escaped from the burning home, after being warned of the fire by George Thomas, a neighbor, who was aroused by the crackling of the flames.

The Schneider store and office of the town clerk opposite the hall were saved through the efforts of townsmen who formed a bucket brigade and kept the front of the building soaked. The Schneider's, besides the loss of the home and hall, lost an automobile, a quantity of hay and a number of hens.

SIXTY-FIVE YEARS AGO

Aug. 5, 1943

Commencing with this week's issue at The Manchester Journal, copies are being sent to every man and woman on Manchester's Honor Roll through the courtesy of the Green Mountain Boys and the Green Mountain Girls. Several months ago, Frank W. Chambers, president of the Green Mountain Boys, started arrangements with the Manchester Printing Co., to carry out the plan of providing the Journal for Manchester's service people.

FORTY YEARS AGO

Aug. 8, 1968

Plans to build a new elementary school in Sunderland have moved a step nearer to a vote after School Directors Stuart Hill, Albert Lawrence and Eleanor Raftery met with Supt. Neil E. Cross and Julian Goodrich, an architect from Burlington.

The Sunderland town meeting earlier this year voted the Sunderland School Board permission to take an option on a possible location for a new building. The directors have since held a number of conferences with a five-man site committee of local residents. They discussed the most likely locations, visited a number of places in the area and finally took an option on a 10-acre tract on the farm of Burton J. Snow, Sr., in the south end of town.

This week the directors inspected the site in company with Goodrich and discussed the proposed building and the program, along with suggested methods and materials of construction.

When an estimate of costs and projected upkeep is available, it will be presented to Sunderland voters who will make the final decision at a special town meeting.

FORTY YEARS AGO

Aug. 8, 1968

Plans to build a new elementary school in Sunderland have moved a step nearer to a vote after School Directors Stuart Hill, Albert Lawrence and Eleanor Raftery met with Supt. Neil E. Cross and Julian Goodrich, an architect from Burlington.

The Sunderland town meeting earlier this year voted the Sunderland School Board permission to take an option on a possible location for a new building. The directors have since held a number of conferences with a five-man site committee of local residents. They discussed the most likely locations, visited a number of places in the area and finally took an option on a 10-acre tract on the farm of Burton J. Snow, Sr., in the south end of town.

This week the directors inspected the site in company with Goodrich and discussed the proposed building and the program, along with suggested methods and materials of construction.

When an estimate of costs and projected upkeep is available, it will be presented to Sunderland voters who will make the final decision at a special town meeting.

FIVE YEARS AGO

Aug. 15, 2003

MANCHESTER — At a public forum Monday evening at the Zion Episcopal Church, Speaker of the House Walter Freed, (R-Dorset), joined Rep. Judith Livingston (R-Manchester) to talk about the new educational funding bill, Act 68.

Livingston explained that the legislature acknowledged that Act 60 was flawed, and that there was a general agreement in Montpelier to fix the problems. The fix is Act 68.

Under the new law, the sharing pool, or shark tank is not necessary, and the designation of gold town or receiving town does not apply.

"There will be a clear relationship between spending and the local tax rate," Livingston said. The more money a town spends on a school budget, the more its citizens will be taxed.

"We had to raise $1 billion, because that's what it costs to educate Vermont's 95,000 school children," she said. "There are only three kinds of taxes that can contribute to that kind of money: Tax income, tax property or tax consumption (sales)."

The new law takes effect in Fiscal 2005, which starts July 2004. It taxes residential or homestead property at $1.10 per $100. Commercial property and second homes are taxed at $1.59 per $100, Livingston said.

In addition, the statewide sales tax will be increased from 5 percent to 6 percent. Manchester will continue to have a local 1 percent optional sales tax added: Powerball will bring about $3 million into the state's coffers. There will be increases in the telecommunications tax as well. That rate will increase about 1-and-one-half percent to 6 percent.

The per-pupil block grant level has been increased to $6,800 per student. Towns that vote to spend above the block grant will all pay the same tax rate for the amount of additional spending.

That is a change from Act 60 where towns that voted to spend above the block grant either had to raise the money through private fund-raising efforts, or send at least twice as much to the state to get back what was needed.

The commercial and second home rate of $1.59 will be the same in every town in the state. This rate cannot be changed except by an act of the legislature. The $1.59 rate will not increase with increased educational spending.

Should a town vote to spend more, the burden will be solely on the local residents, Freed explained.

"Those hands that are raised at town meeting to spend more on education will be the same hands that reach into their pockets to pay for it," Freed said.